Paul Budde
  • PaulBuddeHistory.com covers the historical interests and projects of amateur historian Paul Budde; tracing the broader Budde family history back through North Germany and the Baltic region.

    His personal interest is in medieval North Western Europe. Also covered is the local history of Bucketty, NSW, Australia.

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Personal recollection of Merauke from the 86 (F) Squadron RAAF (English)

Merauke Force

In mid-1942, Merauke, on the south coast of Dutch New Guinea was one of only a few parts of the NEI that had not been occupied by Japanese forces. It was garrisoned by a company of infantry from the KNIL, equipped with the majority of the heavy weapons available to them.

The strategic location of Merauke on the western flank of Allied forces in Papua led Allied commanders to order the building of an airfield there.

On 31 December 1942, Merauke Force was formed, to reinforce the KNIL garrison. At the time of its establishment the force comprised C Company of the Australian 62nd Infantry Battalion, the 1st NEI Fusilier Company and various Royal Australian Air Force units. C Company, 62nd Infantry Battalion arrived at Merauke to reinforce the NEI company and RAAF on 7 January 1943.

The Australian force at Merauke was gradually expanded to a full brigade during the first half of 1943. A Company, 26th Infantry Battalion was added to the force between 29 May and 2 August when it was flown into the inland town of Tanah Merah.

In April 1944 the Australian Army began to plan an offensive along New Guinea’s south coast using elements of Merauke Force.

The planned offensive along New Guinea’s south coast did not eventuate and it was decided to reduce the force at Merauke in mid-1944. On 4 July 1945 the command of the Merauke region was handed over to the Dutch authorities.

Personal recollections from members of the Australian Airforce

The town of Merauke was the centre of Dutch Government control in the southern region of Dutch New Guinea the Governor had the major residence with one main street of other houses it was also the centre of Catholic influence with a Convent, Church and school. When the American’s arrived in force they did for what they are renowned for and that was they renamed the street names from the Dutch to the American such as Main Street and numbered the streets 1st, 2nd, Third and so on. The photo insert left shows the damage to the mission after the first major air raid by the Japanese.

The entire area was only two or three feet above sea level with the water table less than that below ground level. There was only low ridges running through the area every so often. It was on these ridges that all buildings; tent lines, ablution and toilets were erected. The airstrip was built up with decomposed coral. This coral was dug up by the American Construction Company some distance away and transported to the strip site. The strip area too was only three feet above sea level.

When the wet season set in it rained up to 300 inches a year with the humidity so high even with the rain teeming down all one do was to sit in your tent the perspiration would pour out of you. It wasn’t long before we found out that the army tents with fly’s were useless so two chaps in my tent bribed the natives to cover the tent fly with palm leaves the solved the leaks and insulated the tent by shading it. The mosquitoes there were also a terrible problem, once the sun had set you had to cover every part of you or they swarm over you. This increased the risk of getting Malaria and Dengue Fever, even though we were all on the full dosage of Atebrin. A lot of us went down with these fevers. It wasn’t long before the men were infected with things like dermatitis, tropical sores, sweat rashes and ulcers there was very little that the Medical Officer and his staff could apart from applying calamine lotion .

When we had settled into Merauke, It was decided to plant the seeds collected at Gawler, some natives were hired to clear a site and the garden planted. Peas, beans, tomatoes, onions, turnips and cabbages the seed soon germinated and grew like mad in fact too fast as most went to seed before we could harvest them and that was the end of them. Another problem was the wild pigs, what didn’t go to seed was soon eaten by these pigs. We had to abandon the garden and let the jungle growth reclaim the lot.

 MeraukeDamaged mission building

Merauke                                                                     Bomb damaged mission building

Village of MeraukeRAAF HQ Merauke

 

The Village of Merauke                                                                 RAAF HQ